Gloria Authors Resolution Calling on Trump Administration, Congress to Resettle Refugees

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Gloria Authors Resolution Calling on Trump Administration, Congress to Resettle Refugees

SACRAMENTO, CA – California State Assemblymember Todd Gloria (D-San Diego) has authored and successfully advanced a resolution calling on the federal government to resettle all 30,000 refugees it has previously committed to resettle in 2019, and officially declaring support for the resettlement of refugees in California.

California has long lived up to its promise to welcome refugees. It’s the right thing to do and we take pride in our diversity,” said Assemblymember Todd Gloria. “The Trump Administration has an obligation to stand behind this population as past administrations, Democratic and Republican, have done in the past. This resolution puts the California Legislature, representing over 39 million Californians, on the record in calling on Donald Trump to resettle 30,000 refugees this year.”

Assembly Joint Resolution 19 (AJR 19) signals the Legislature’s support for the resettlement of refugees in California no matter one’s race, nationality, sexual orientation, gender identity, or country of origin. It calls on local governments to support stronger national efforts to resettle some of the world’s most vulnerable refugees and calls on the federal administration to resettle all 30,000 refugees the U.S. has committed to resettle in 2019. In addition, AJR 19 urges Congress and the Trump Administration to raise the Presidential Determination to at least 75,000 refugees for fiscal year 2020.

Today, AJR 19 was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and now heads to a vote by the full California State Senate. If passed by the Senate, AJR 19 will be deemed officially adopted and the resolution will be transmitted to the President, Vice President, Senate Majority Leader, Speaker of the House, and each member of the California congressional delegation.

A refugee is defined as someone forced to flee their home country because of a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of political opinion, race, religion, nationality, or membership of a particular social group.